Zilker_map

Visitor's Information

Hours: 5 AM - 10 PM daily

Fees: Park greenspace and Nature & Science Center -- Free

Umlauf Sculpture Garden -- Children (0- 12) Free; Adults $5; Seniors (60+) $3

Zilker Botanical Gardens -- Children under 2 Free; Children (3-12) and 62+ $1; Adult residents $2; Non-resident Adults $3

Barton Springs Pool -- Entry fees range from $2 (child resident) to $9 (adult non-resident)

Parking: $5 per car

Rules: Except in designated off-leash areas, dogs must be kept on leash no longer than 6 feet. Scoop the Poop. Disruptive or criminal behavior may lead to ejection from park. No weapons or firearms unless use is expressly allowed. PARD may impound parked vehicles that create unsafe conditions.

Explorer's Checklist

  • Picnic or kick a ball around on the Great Lawn. Sit atop Rock Island.
  • Find the dinosaur footprints in the Botanical Gardens.
  • Attend a public guided tour at the Umlauf Sculpture Garden.
  • Check out the Birds of Prey and Wildlife Exhibits at the Nature & Science Center. Explore the Naturalist Workshop.
  • Enjoy a performance at the Hillside Theater.
  • Walk along the edge of the Edwards Plateau as you ramble through the Zilker Nature Preserve.
Picnic
Playscape
Sports Fields
Education Center

Latest Explorer Observation

Barton Springs full view from above Zilker
50x1200 wave separator

FORMER ZILKER PARK RESIDENTS

The land at the confluence of Barton Creek and the Colorado River has been the site of human activity for thousands of years. Indigenous groups viewed the many springs and the accompanying abundance of animals and plants an oasis and essential to survival. During the 1800s, Anglo settlers used the same waters to power mills and the land for agriculture. Stone, gravel, and sand were extracted to meet the needs of a growing city. Local entrepreneur, Andrew Zilker, acquired this land in the early 1900s to grow grains to feed the horses his ice factory used for deliveries. After his wife died, Zilker gave up his plans to build an estate here. Instead, he donated 350 acres to the school district to sell to the City, creating Austin's premier public open space. It was officially designated Zilker Park in 1937.

Andrew Jackson Zilker
ZILKER BRIDGE
50x1200 wave separator

Volunteer Info

Save Barton Creek Association

City of Austin Wildland Conservation Division

Austin Parks Foundation

Keep Austin Beautiful

TreeFolks

City of Austin Watershed Protection Department

50x1200 wave separator

Explorer Gallery

long skinny block color tweaks