Visitor's Information

Hours: 8 AM - dusk daily, except on Christmas

Fees: Swimming area: Children (0-3yrs) Free; Youth (4-12yrs) $6; Adult (13-59) $10; Senior (60+) or Military $6; Tuesday & Thursday: discount for 78676 Residents ONLY

Parking: Parking lot on-site. Free public parking is available at the corner of 3rd St. and Rock St.

Rules: Service dogs only. No jumping from cliffs or fishing. No smoking, alcohol, or glass containers.

Explorer's Checklist

  • Take a nature walk through the forest; play sand volleyball; spread a blanket for a riverside picnic.
  • Stay overnight on a Family Campout.
  • Sit in the shade of majestic cypress trees and dangle your feet in these cold, clean waters.
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Latest Explorer Observation

Photo by Friends of Blue Hole
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This scenic 126-acre park along Cypress Creek is roughly four miles downstream from Jacob's Well and is the home of an iconic swimming hole. Visitors can splash into chilly, spring-fed water from rope swings and relax along the banks under the shade of giant trees. Set amidst an idyllic natural landscape, trails and paths built from repurposed materials weave through the park. Rainwater is harvested for landscape irrigation, and strategic entry points limit erosion and allow for vegetation regrowth. Such efforts toward sustainability allowed Blue Hole to receive SITES certification.

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CYPRESS TREE WOOD

The decay-resistant properties of cypress trees make them a durable building material. Native Americans carved single log canoes from them. Early settlers harvested the wood for shingles, log cabins, and barns. They form part of the natural tapestry that makes Hill Country creeks so special.

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COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

In 2005, the idea for a regional park took shape as residents of the newly incorporated town of Wimberley sought a way to protect Blue Hole and the surrounding ecosystem. They established the Friends of Blue Hole and raised funds to purchase the land.

The community continues to be a central force in the continued stewardship of this park through volunteer restoration and the development of the Cypress Creek Watershed Protection Plan.

The flow of Cypress Creek is sustained by waters flowing from the Trinity Aquifer, the main water supply for the surrounding community.

Photo by Friends of Blue Hole
Photo by Friends of Blue Hole
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Volunteer Info

Save Barton Creek Association

City of Austin Wildland Conservation Division

Austin Parks Foundation

Keep Austin Beautiful

TreeFolks

City of Austin Watershed Protection Department

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Explorer Gallery

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